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Reading

“Today a reader, tomorrow a leader.”

Children learn great fluency, skills and attitudes to reading.

Intent

Reading is a vital form of communication for everyone. In developing the skill of reading, children gain access to and derive pleasure from rich and varied sources of literature and a wide variety of facts and figures contained within non-fiction. The ability to read and interpret the written language is a fundamental skill for accessing all other areas of the curriculum and is an essential life-long skill.

Key to improving outcomes in all subjects is fostering a love of reading. There is substantial evidence to show how reading impacts on a wide range of issues, including attainment, mental health, economic wellbeing and relationships.

When teaching reading and associated reading skills, we aim to raise and/or sustain pupils’ levels of attainment / achievement in reading throughout the school by developing a number of attitudes and skills:

Principally, we want our children to enjoy reading. We aim to develop, through our teaching of reading, the following attitudes:

 Through all processes involving the teaching of reading, the following knowledge and skills will be developed:

●       curiosity and interest

●       pleasure

●       sensitivity

●       critical appraisal

●       independence

●       confidence

●       perseverance

●       respect for other views and cultures

●       reflection

●       appreciation of the feelings and cultural experiences of others

●       phonic decoding

●       fluency with expression and clarity

●       understanding vocabulary

●       understanding of sentence structure and punctuation

●       comprehension, inference and implication

●       obtaining information quickly

●       understanding key features of different texts

●       critical reflection

●       interpretation of authors’ language, meaning thoughts and feelings

●       performance of poetry, song etc

  • We want to inspire children to be life-long readers. Reading is the gateway to pupils’ learning and a life-long passion.
  • We are inspired to read because of our wonderful range of up-to-date books in our school library and engaging reading corners. These fuel our inquisitive minds.
  • We are inspired through the wide and rich variety of text that are planned into reading lessons as children progress through school, including new fiction and classics, poetry and a range of non-fiction.
  • Staff in school inspire us by being great reading role models.
  • We learn about inspirational people and events through reading, raising our aspirations.
  • We are inspired to learn more about the world through our cross-curricular reading.
  • We engage children in reading using exciting ‘hook’ lessons such as drama and art.

  • The reading curriculum and our St. Anne’s Learning Powers equip our learners with the knowledge and attitudes necessary to embrace new challenges, adapt to an ever-changing world, and thrive as individuals.
  • With our positive mindsets, reading books and other texts read independently are the right level of challenge for us to improve our reading skills: not too easy and not too hard. 
  • Class texts challenge us because they are chosen to stretch our understanding of vocabulary and other reading skills.
  • If we have SEND, we are challenged at a level that is appropriate to us.
  • Our teachers challenge us to improve by modelling new reading skills and helping us practise, before reducing the support they give us.
  • We are challenged to read in all subjects, learning rich, subject-specific vocabulary and use our oracy skills to articulate our ideas. 

  • Our reading curriculum aims to cultivate courageous advocates among our pupils by providing a knowledge-based education firmly rooted in Christian teachings, nurturing their ability to stand up for justice, compassion, and love in their communities and beyond.
  • Through reading, children learn to form positive and healthy relationships, respecting the creations of God in all their manifestations, and fostering an environment of unity, compassion, and appreciation for the richness of human and natural diversity.
  • Reading helps us understanding and respect others, developing our empathy skills. This happens through learning about authors and the contexts that some books are written within, as well as through reading stories where we can infer feelings, thoughts and motivations of characters.
  • We read about significant issues and changes that have happened and are happening in the world now, such as global warming and pollution, teaching us to care for our planet and each other.
  • Our Learning Challenges are linked to our school values and our reading planned texts match these, ensuring children read texts that teach us to care for our planet and life on it.
  • Through reading, we learn about important people who are caring role models (eg Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King). 

  • Our reading curriculum aims to foster respect and promote an understanding of the diverse beliefs and cultures of individuals within our local, national, and global community.
  • Through reading, our children learn how to become stewards of God’s earth.
  • Children learn how to care for and respect themselves; looking after their own physical and mental wellbeing.
  • Through reading, we learn about important people who are role models of respect (eg Ghandi).
  • Our Learning Challenges are linked to our school values and our reading planned texts match these, ensuring children read texts that teach us to care and respect.

 

Implementation

Reading is prioritised to ensure ALL pupils, including those with SEND, access the full curriculum offer. 

Early Reading

  •  Early reading ensures our children gain both phonics knowledge and language comprehension through the delivery of Read, Write, Inc.
  • In EYFS, we begin developing positive attitudes to reading through at least daily texts, modelled aloud. All adults are reading role-models, demonstrating positive attitudes to reading. Opportunities to read and engage with texts can be found throughout the areas of provision.

What do we read?

  •  Reading happens in a variety of ways: reading lessons, phonics lessons, Class Novels and cross-curricular reading (eg in a Learning Challenge or Science lesson). See Reading Policy for more details.
  • Children read a balanced range of texts, including class novels, poems, extracts, picture books and non-fiction. These texts are chosen to link with our Learning Challenges, to develop cultural capital, or to reflect the diversity of modern Britain (see Reading Policy).

How do we teach reading?

  • Reading for pleasure is promoted through adult role models, choice of texts, varied and engaging lesson activities and one-off events.
  • There is a sequential approach (see Reading Policy) to the reading curriculum to ensure development of fluency, confidence, skills and enjoyment.
  • An emphasis is placed on developing reading fluency through explicit teaching of vocabulary, repeated re-reading and other fluency-specific strategies such as echo or choral reading.
  • Our 5-step approach to whole-class reading develops children’s fluency, vocabulary and comprehension skills.
  • Those currently finding reading particularly challenging receive additional reading practice and/or support. This may be through daily or regular reading 1:1 with an adult, small group fluency session or comprehension-based interventions.

Through CPD and other support, leaders improve teachers’ pedagogy, understanding and appropriate use of assessment. Assessment allows us to identify and support pupils either through catch up interventions or differentiation. This ensures that every member of staff provides high quality teaching.

Impact 

At St Anne's, we love reading!

Speaking to children, looking at books and being part of lessons, we know:

  • children are reading widely and often
  • books are generally well-chosen to match the current reading attainment of the children
  • KS1 children’s books match their position in RWI 
  • lessons are taught well, are engaging and appropriately challenging
  • lessons develop reading skills over time
  • most children enjoy reading

We're really proud of the attainment and progress that children make during their time at our school. Progress at the end of Y6 in 2023 was 'Well Above Average' (measuring 5.16, using DfE figures).

Attainment Headlines

2019

2022

2023

EYFS

Word Reading

School: 76%

National: 77%

School: 82%

National: 75%

School: 78%

National:

Comprehension

School: 86%

National: 80%

School: 100%

National:

Writing

School: 76%

National:77%

School: 79%

National:77%

School: 78%

National:

Listening, Attention and Understanding

School: 83%

National: 82%

School: 82%

National: 80%

School: 78%

National:

Speaking

School: 90%

National: 73%

School: 79%

National: 68%

School:78%

National:

Phonics

Year 1

School: 80%

National: 82 %

School: 87%

National: 75%

School: 90%

National: 79%

Year 2 recheck

School: 81%

School: 50%

School: 100%

KS1

Expected standard

School: 77%

National: 75%

School: 59%

National: 67%

School: 65%

National: 68%

Greater depth

School: 35%

National: 25%

School: 28%

National: 18%

School: 35%

National: 22%

KS2

Expected standard

School: 74%

National: 73%

School: 83%

National: 74%

School: 100%

National: 79%

Greater depth

School: 38%

National: 27%

School: 40%

National: 28%

School: 50%

National: 29%